Summits Yellow

Consumers opting for on-demand TV is impacting their mental availability for brands

Tyrone Stewart

Netflix ChromecastThe continuing rise of paid on-demand TV consumption, along with the people spending more and more time on their smartphones, means that brands have less opportunities get the attention of consumers.

According to an international study from On Device Research, 47 per cent of people said they choose on-demand TV over traditional TV due to fewer ads, while 87 per cent of respondents said they use mobile apps for more than two hours a day. These figures show that consumers are less mentally available for brands, as they are moving away from the fixed advertising of traditional media.

The study also revealed that there is a growing connection between mobile devices and TVs, with 51 per cent of survey respondents claiming to have controlled their TV via mobile in the last three months. This figure rises, as you’d expect, to 61 per cent among 18 to 34-year olds

“Consumers are clearly moving their attention from linear TV to on-demand TV, which often includes no advertising,” said Alistair Hill, co-founder and CEO of On Device Research. “This presents huge challenges for brands attempting to engage consumers, and drive that much needed mental availability. Eye balls have moved to mobile, which our effectiveness research shows is proven to help build brands.”

In addition, the research found that consumer habits are having a knock-on effect to physical availability – relating to the point of purchase – as there has been a seven per cent decline in shopping centre visits, and 75 per cent of respondents claimed to shop online at least once a month.

Elsewhere, the report showed evidence that it is important that brands get into the thinking of consumers to show off their quality and authenticity. 64 per cent of respondents said quality is the most important thing to consider when shopping. This was followed by 26 per cent saying brand authenticity, and only 20 per cent saying well-known brands were the most important to them.